We Call It Death

That a company would actually put out promotional material like this and be dead serious about it just makes my skin crawl. Ya carbon dioxide is a natural element of life and so is water. But if the entire planet got submerged under water, would they still be singing the same tune? I mean give me a break. You’d almost expect this company to start marketing CO2 "enriched" water or something. It’s amazing how seriously screwed up people can get when it comes to money. At least some people are trying to show how absurd these ads really are (parody starts about 30 seconds in) but not sure if it is enough, as I could see some people actually believing that excessive amounts of carbon dioxide are a "good thing".

"What’s that orange color over the city Mommy?"
"That’s called carbon dioxide honey. Don’t worry it’s a good thing and a natural part of life. Now hurry up and finish your McDonald’s cheeseburger and lets go. Mommy’s got to pick up her new SUV."

5 thoughts on “We Call It Death

  1. I thought you had sworn off of youtube?

    It’s funny in the world of advertising and counter-advertising how many overlaps there are. It almost makes you think that some players are playing both sides. There were numerous images in that film (youtube) that link to people who seem to be active in many camps.

  2. > I thought you had sworn off of youtube? <

    I’m definitely not referring anyone to use them for their own video content, if that’s what you mean. In this case though, the video I found was referenced on YouTube itself, so I pretty much had to point to it. In other words, if I see notable videos on blogs, I’ll link to them no matter where they are hosted.

    > There were numerous images in that film (youtube) that link to people who seem to be active in many camps. <

    Well with disinformation, that’s really the whole idea (to slant negative things to look positive). For example, they may have made some players look to be on their side when in actual fact they may not be. This occurs in the media everyday, with reporters / media companies putting their own "spin" on things and twisting what someone says out of the context it was said within.

    I guess when you boil everything down though, the message I’m hearing from this company is that they assume politicians and organizations are going to pass a law and overnight everyone will have to start walking and riding around on bicycles with all forms of oil-based transporation being halted immediately. This is hilarious as it would obviously cause havoc within our society.

    The obvious approach is to make these changes slowly so that it doesn’t impact us overnight. I mean that’s why people keep screaming to start making changes now because it will take time to turn everything around. I mean there are lots of car companies already looking at running their vehicles on a variety of different energy sources. Again the idea is to start now and slowly make the changes because to be able to utilize these vehicles, we’ll need a infrastructure in place to support them (i.e. refueling stations that support this alternative energy). I mean there’s already been mention of creating a Hydrogen Highway along the West Coast of North America to get this started.

  3. — I guess when you boil everything down though, the message I’m hearing from this company is that they assume politicians and organizations are going to pass a law and overnight everyone will have to start walking and riding around on bicycles with all forms of oil-based transporation being halted immediately. This is hilarious as it would obviously cause havoc within our society. —

    It would cause havoc and I agree that a slow approach is best. The problem is that some people will never change. Many people live in communities that have felt strong-armed by the green party with respect to making changes rapidly. I don’t know what the term is when you isolate people and "rush" them (similar to frat and sorority rushes) but many are experiencing this and have found it unpleasant because they cannot financially make the changes fast enough. Then I guess you have the resulting push-back. Maybe it is just the difference in the anarchist mentality and the green mentality

  4. > I don’t know what the term is when you isolate people and "rush" them (similar to frat and sorority rushes) but many are experiencing this and have found it unpleasant because they cannot financially make the changes fast enough.<

    Hmm, define "rush" though. I mean if someone is told year after year that they are overharvesting resources which will prevent future sustainability, they usually won’t care one bit and will ignore what you say. I’ve even heard forestry workers in BC (who were arguing with green activists at the time) say outright they knew there wouldn’t be any forestry jobs for their kids in the future because of overharvesting. Therefore, you have people who fully realize the implications of what they are doing but only care about sticking with "what they know" until it "dries up". Then and only then do they usually "jump ship" and look for something else. The devastation of the Canadian East Coast fisheries in the early 90’s was a good example of an industry that was literally destroy overnight because of this overharvesting.

    I don’t blame these people though because if I was in the same situation, I’d probably stick with "what I know" until I was forced out as well. The smart thing to do though is start diversifying before you "hit the wall" and make the transition slowly. Many communities within BC are doing this now with tourism being an excellent way to diversify away from natural resource based economies. The idea is to help these communities make the transition from one way of life to another. Again, a lot of people will kick and scream though, avoiding to make the change at any cost. I’ve even seen documentaries on elephant ivory tusk traders in Africa wailing about their "way of life" being lost. It’s actually hilarious to see in a sad sort of way.

    The thing that everyone needs to realize is that with the changing times, all things change (i.e. industrial => knowledge / technology). Thus we need to focus not only on diversifying our economies but we also need to ensure the sustainability of those resources that sustain life on this planet. That I see is the biggest problem on this planet today. Overconsumption and growth. We assume everything is endless or we have no care of future generations. I’ve heard people say "It’s there problem (the future generations). Not mine." We need to realize that we’re all in this together and everything in life is connected, just like how we’re connected on the Web. Unfortunately these real life connections aren’t often visible like links on the Web, thus many people aren’t really aware of them. Hmmm, well… that is until it hits them in the face (i.e. power blackouts, sky rocketing gas prices, etc).

  5. > …because they cannot financially make the changes fast enough <

    Sorry, one more quick point. I’m a strong believer in ensuring sustainability for everyone (which is why I believe there is a better economic module that can work for everyone on the Web). I’m totally with you in ensuring that these communities and people are provided financial assistance to ensure they can make the transition instead of being "left to die" financially on their own. What I’m against though (as I noted above) is assisting those who have continued to disregard the warning signs and have refused previous aid in making that transition.

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